Advocating for Your Special Needs Child

Rod Paige (the 7th United States Secretary of Education) once said “There is no more powerful advocate than a parent armed with information and options.”

Now, as a special needs parent, I fully understand the truth in this quote.

Yes, every parent must know that part of their job is advocating for their child. It’s common sense, right? We all want what is best for them.

But, prior to January 2020, when I was just your average Mom with normally developing kids, there really wasn’t a need for me to advocate for them. We of course would research the best schools, pediatricians and other options out there but that was every day stuff that parents do.

In the past month alone I have done more advocating for Livvy than ever before.

Getting anything you need or want for your special needs child is a MAJOR task. And don’t expect for companies or vendors you work with to follow up with you. None of them will. It has been our job to do all of the follow up to ensure she is getting everything she needs when she needs it.

For example…

I have had to text our pediatrician requests on 8 separate occasions.

I have had to call a new pump company we are transferring to for Livvy’s GTube supplies 10+ times.

We have had 3 meetings to trial eye gaze devices, with a follow up meeting to come, before we decide on one and then wait weeks to months to receive it.

I have had to speak with our neurologist about medications twice.

I have had to schedule PT, OT and feeding therapy appointments.

I have had to personally email prescriptions and referrals from doctors to vendors because their fax number isn’t working or they gave me the wrong one. Side note: can we please stop using fax machines?!?!

The list goes on. Keeping Livvy as stable as possible is a full-time job. Especially as her disease progresses and her needs (medically and for physical comfort and mobility) change.

To any parents who are new to the special needs run around, know that you are not alone. The frustrating back and forth and hoops to jump through is (unfortunately) normal. It is up to YOU to make sure your child is getting what they need.

Support systems through DDD and the like offer some wonderful assistance but it still requires work on the part of the parent to get the ball rolling when it comes to getting any kind of device or specialized care.

Be your child’s voice. Be their strong arm. Go with your gut. You do know best.

For Those Extra Special Moms

To the mom who didn’t get “just a healthy one”:

A healthy baby .
That’s what you want.

Boy or girl? Doesn’t matter.
Just a healthy one.

With ten perfect fingers and ten perfect toes.
A tiny smile and button noes.

A brain that works as mine and yours.
Tests coming back with perfect scores.

A heart that beats strong—the rhythm of drums.
And the in and out breath of healthy lungs.

But then you find out it won’t be so.
An unhealthy child— so much unknown.

A journey full of winding roads.
Ups and downs. Such highs and lows.

A little one fighting for their life—
And you, strong beside them in perfect stride.

Just pushing them forward with all that you are— a mother who hasn’t backed down thus far.

This motherhood it will indeed be hard.
The heartbreak will leave inevitable scars.

Not a motherhood you had ever planned for—
But it won’t be less. It will be more.

More love needed and more to give.
An understanding compassion that is so so big.

More strength than you had ever known.
A faith in God and Him alone.

You’ll learn to hope beyond all reason.
And lay down burdens in every season.

You’ll fight and give up and fight some more.
You won’t be stopped by seemingly closed doors.

You’ll give more than you knew you could.
And though you’ll grow weary you’ll still see the good.

Yes this child— unhealthy as they may be.
This child has allowed you so much to see.

Joy and beauty.
Pain and sorrow.
A gratitude for every single tomorrow.

This child is adored— a gift from above.
A newfound passion full of motherhood love.

So this is to the mother of an unhealthy child.
Who holds up her head, moves forward and smiles.

Your motherhood was not the way that you planned.
But today you love more— and stronger you stand.

I’m not sure who wrote this but it was shared with me by another MLD Mom. And it is so true. To all my other extra special Moms, a very Happy Mother’s Day to you!