Med Changes and Eye Gazes for Livvy

It has been a while since I posted. Mainly because it has been a busy month for all of us and one of many ups and downs for Livvy.

While Dave and the girls were in Italy, Livvy started having these random bouts of pain that were inexplicable. Nothing looked like it was physically or outwardly hurting her so we assumed it must be internal. After seeing her neurologist and explaining the issue he suggested trying a low dose of Gabapentin. We had tried Gabapentin when she was first diagnosed last year and she had a weird reaction like she didn’t like the way it made her feel. But this time, it worked! Those random bouts of pain went away and we were so grateful!

We also met with a palliative care doctor at Phoenix Children’s Hospital. He agreed with the medication routine she was currently on and we also inquired about THC drops, as we heard they worked well for other MLD kiddos. He said other families he has spoken have said they have changed their childrens’ lives and that it is worth a try so I placed an order at a local shop (Marijuana is now legal recreationally in AZ) and picked up some drops. Those also seemed to do a great job at lowering her anxiety/frustration and feeling better overall.

Next, (while everyone was still in Italy) we ran out of her Amitriptyline (drops that were prescribed to us in Italy because they couldn’t get her usual Nortriptyline). Thinking nothing of it, because doctors assured us these meds are really one in the same we moved her right on to the Nortriptyline. And it did not go well! She started having a similar reaction to it as she first did on Gabapentin. She clearly did not like the way it made her feel. So after consulting the doctor I cut her dose in half. Still didn’t like it. So I cut it in half again. And at that point the dose was so small I wondered if she even needed it. So we weaned her off and she has been doing great without it! MLD kids always have so many meds they take so when we can do away with one it’s amazing!

Next up on the list was getting an eye gaze device. These things are such a game changer! For kids and adults alike who can’t speak, it allows them to look at words and/or pictures on a screen and by a glance of their eye alone they can speak, make choices and express feelings. Getting one in a timely fashion, however, is no easy task but that’s a whole other blog post.

We began this process working with Livvy’s team through the Arizona Early Intervention Program (who children are enrolled with prior to three years of age and then they go into the Long Term Care program through DDD). After she turned 3 in May we had to send in the necessary paperwork to get it referred by our pediatrician and she just had her first two trials of eye gaze devices!

The first one we trialed was EyeTech, which seemed much more extensive in its options but maybe a little more cumbersome to learn and navigate. The rep mentioned one gentleman actually used CAD via this device!

The second we trialed was called PRC which Livvy seemed to be able to use a bit better but the options didn’t seem as extensive.

Tomorrow, we have one more trial with Tobii Dynavox, which is the option many other MLD kids use so we are looking forward to that and then meet with our therapy team next week to make a decision.

I hope this will be a device that Livvy is able to learn and use so that we can again hear what she is thinking or wants (or doesn’t want). Such a miracle! We are so excited!

4 thoughts on “Med Changes and Eye Gazes for Livvy

  1. Amazing technology is such a blessing, especially for children like Livvy – praying you find a perfect one for her – sending much much love and many many prayers- love you all❤️🥲❤️😘

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  2. I hope you are able to find the adequate technology for Livvy.
    Lots of hugs and prayers❤❤🙏🏽🙏🏽🙏🏽Bendiciones! Love you all!

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  3. Your blogs are so informative! Eye gaze devices! Of all things! It never occurred to me that this could be an option for Livvy or other children with MLD. Bravo for being her hero by being so quickly sensitive to her reaction to meds. She is lucky to have you as her mom and advocate. Carry on!

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